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British Army, Guinness and Lidl among 38 campaigns shortlisted for 2018 IPA Effectiveness Awards

The British Army, Guinness and Lidl are among the 38 outstanding campaigns shortlisted for the 2018 IPA Effectiveness Awards, the world’s most rigorous and prestigious Awards scheme with entrants having to prove the payback of their communications activity.

13/08/2018

Key stats from the 2018 IPA Effectiveness Awards shortlist:

  • Eight overseas entries made this year’s shortlist, including work from Australia, Canada and China.
  • This year’s shortlist includes 12 joint entries and 26 single entries.
  • Food and drink is the best represented sector with eight shortlisted entries, followed by retail (five), pharmaceuticals (five), and automotive (four).
  • From an agency holding company perspective, WPP has the most shortlisted entries with nine, and is closely followed by Publicis (eight) and Omnicom (seven).
  • Eight independent agencies have had their work shortlisted for the awards.

Says Neil Godber, Convenor of Judges and Head of Planning, J. Walter Thompson London: “During the judging process we have seen lots of outstanding case studies that have provided some fascinating insights into the future of our industry, including the proper commercial application of social media and new understandings of the reinvention of sponsorship. Once again the IPA Effectiveness Awards demonstrate the pinnacle of marketing effectiveness and will prove invaluable to our knowledge of what makes great advertising.”

The Awards contribute to the IPA Databank* and will be used to further enhance the industry’s knowledge of communications effectiveness through ongoing IPA research. The winners will be celebrated at a gala ceremony at on the 9th October at the London Hilton on Park Lane during the IPA’s Effectiveness Week, a week of events that brings together marketers, C-Suite executives, agencies, media organisations and industry bodies to interrogate the crucial building blocks of marketing effectiveness.

Combined tickets are available for both EffWeek 2018 and the 2018 IPA Effectiveness Awards. Alternatively you can buy tickets to the Awards only.

The 2018 Effectiveness Awards are sponsored by DBS Data, Facebook, Google, Marsh, Newsworks, Radiocentre, System1, Thinkbox and Warc.

Full 2018 IPA Effectiveness Awards Shortlist:

  • 32Red (Kindred Group) by M.i. Media - 32Red: How marketing communications fuelled an online casino's hot streak
  • Aldi by McCann UK - Kevin the Carrot 2016 and 2017: How Aldi UK won Christmas with the help of a humble carrot
  • Aldi by McCann UK - Shop, Eat. Repeat. How a bold repositioning campaign restored Aldi to record growth
  • Art Institute of Chicago by Leo Burnett Chicago and Art Institute of Chicago - Van Gogh's Bedrooms: The power of an immersive idea
  • Audi UK by BBH - Beauty and brains: How we supercharged the Audi premium 2015-2018
  • Baileys (Diageo) by Mother and Carat – Baileys: A radical brand turnaround story with extra sprinkles
  • Barclays by BBH - Purpose pays
  • British Army, (Capita for the British Army) by Karmarama and MediaCom - Helping a new generation find where they belong in the British Army
  • Covonia (Thornton & Ross) by Bray Leino - Rediscovering the power of Covonia
  • David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust by whiteGREY - Hello in Elephant: Translating an endangered language to help save an endangered species
  • DFS by krow communications and MediaCom - Turning DFS from a value brand into a brand that people value
  • Direct Line Group by Direct Line Group and Ebiquity - They went short. We went long
  • Ella's Kitchen by Havas London - Selling up doesn’t mean selling out
  • Guinness (Diageo) by AMV BBDO – Guinness: Made Of More, 2012 - 2018
  • Heineken by Publicis Italia and Publicis Singapore - A Game Changer: How Heineken reinvented its champions league communications
  • IAG Cargo (International Airlines Group) by BBH - IAG Cargo FWD.Rewards: Building strength in numbers
  • IKEA by Mother and Vizeum - The Wonderful Everyday
  • Lidl by TBWA\London and Starcom - How Lidl grew a lot
  • National Art Pass (Art Fund) by MullenLowe London - The art of effectiveness
  • Nationwide Building Society by VCCP and Wavemaker London - How Nationwide found its voice and the difference that made
  • Parodontax (GSK) by Grey London - Selling an oral care oxymoron: Toothpaste for gums
  • Prospan (Flordis Australia) by AFFINITY - The world's first cough predictor
  • Purplebricks by SNAP LDN - How Purplebricks brought Commisery to the UK's estate agents
  • Ribena (Lucozade Ribena Suntory) by J. Walter Thompson - Ribena: A case for the defence
  • Rogue (Nissan Canada) by Juniper Park\TBWA - From also-ran to front-runner: How Nissan made Rogue a sales hero by making winter heroes of Canadian drivers
  • SK-II (P&G) by Forsman & Bodenfors - SK-II: The Marriage Market Takeover: How giving 'leftover' women in China a voice transformed a luxury skin care brand
  • Skittles (Mars) by adam&eveDDB - Breaking conventions with Pride
  • Soothers (Nestlé) by Ogilvy Australia - Any number of sore throats
  • Sport England by FCB Inferno - This Girl Can: Giving judgement the finger (& inspiring millions of women to get active)
  • Starbucks by Manning Gottlieb OMD - Starbucks and social: How Starbucks created the fourth place in coffee culture
  • Suzuki by the7stars - Suzuki Saturdays
  • The AA by adam&eveDDB and Carat - The AA: From spark-plugs to singalongs
  • True Match (L’Oréal Paris) by McCann London - How L'Oréal Paris UK True Match climbed to No.1 by making everyone feel ‘Worth It’
  • U by Kotex (Kimberly Clark Australia) by Ogilvy Australia – ‘Let's move on’
  • Virgin Media by BBH - Finding our Virginity: How fighting fact with feeling helped Virgin Media take on the might of Sky
  • Vype (British American Tobacco) by J. Walter Thompson - Vype quality: A tale of two marketing models
  • Weetabix by BBH and Ebiquity - A Rembrandt in the attic: Rediscovering the value of 'Have you had your Weetabix?'
  • Yorkshire Tea (Bettys and Taylors of Harrogate) by Lucky Generals and Goodstuff Communications - Waking the sleep shoppers: A proper effective campaign for Yorkshire Tea

Join the conversation on social using #IPAEff

Summaries of the shortlisted campaigns:

32Red (Kindred Group) by M.i. Media - 32Red: How marketing communications fuelled an online casino's hot streak

Gambling business, 32Red, had an ambitious plan to double UK revenues to £100m in four years. It would involve adding more new customers in three years than it had in the previous 12, as well as growing revenue per player. Via modelling and smart use of data, a new strategy identified high value customers and delivered significant growth in new players through an effective mix of search, TV advertising, sports sponsorship, and content partnerships. The £100m target was reached one year early. 32Red was eventually sold for £176m, four times its valuation at the start of the growth plan.

Aldi by McCann UK - Kevin the Carrot 2016 and 2017: How Aldi UK won Christmas with the help of a humble carrot

Despite success as a discount supermarket, Aldi still had an issue at Christmas. Its core shoppers spent disproportionately more than average on making their Christmas special, but they didn’t spend it all with Aldi. By creating and sticking with the Kevin the Carrot character over Christmas 2016-2017, Aldi stayed more top of mind for its shoppers, built an emotional connection with the brand and showcased its Christmas range. Aldi dramatically reduced its Christmas dip in market share and became the fastest-growing supermarket of Christmas 2016 and 2017.

Aldi by McCann UK - Shop, Eat. Repeat. How a bold repositioning campaign restored Aldi to record growth

Aldi’s sales growth slowed from 19.3% in 2015 to 12.3% in 2016 – amounting to a £347m lost revenue opportunity. It needed shoppers to reappraise its brand and visit stores more frequently. Through the ‘Everyday Amazing’ positioning, Aldi encouraged consumers to view its products as good enough for top-up purchases and not just a value-led big shop. The Brownlee brothers were chosen as accessible spokesmen in TV ads, online, social, in-store, and other channels. Following the activity, annual frequency of visits per customer rose from 19.1 to 19.8. Sales growth recovered to 19.1%, resulting in £1bn of incremental revenue, and 6.1% market share.

Art Institute of Chicago by Leo Burnett Chicago and Art Institute of Chicago - Van Gogh's Bedrooms: The power of an immersive idea

The Art Institute of Chicago wanted to publicise its Van Gogh exhibition and broaden the audience for art, particularly by getting more Chicago locals to visit the museum. A strategy was built on the insight that art was an immersive experience, not a series of objects to view. Digital and outdoor positioned the show as a keyhole into the artist’s world, with activity culminating in a recreation of Van Gogh’s painted bedroom that could be booked via Airbnb. The exhibition generated the museum’s best attendance figures in 15 years, $1.6M of long-term revenue from new memberships, and local museum visitors outnumbered tourists for the first time in 10 years.

Audi UK by BBH - Beauty and brains: How we supercharged the Audi premium 2015-2018

Audi’s UK growth had come from its less expensive cars. It aspired to sell more cars to higher value customers. Using a strategic idea of the ‘progressive premium’, Audi launched a programme to communicate the desirability and technical innovation of its cars to higher spending users across various channels. Following the activity, Audi became top for desirability among the prestige audience. Sales volumes grew three times faster than the UK market. Between 2015 and 2017, an estimated £1.78bn of incremental revenue was generated and the profit ROMI was £2.07 for every £1 invested.

Baileys (Diageo) by Mother and Carat – Baileys: A radical brand turnaround story with extra sprinkles

Although a loved drinks brand, Baileys was consumed infrequently and in small amounts. Sales were declining by 8% a year. To restart growth, the ‘Don’t mind if I Baileys’ strategy re-framed Baileys as a real adult treat. Creative highlighted the versatility of Baileys as a food and drink ingredient using a channel mix including TV, programmatic, and social content. Following the activity, the number of ways people consumed Baileys grew by 30% and sales volumes increased by 11%. This case estimates there was a 54% increase in annual net profit despite lower investment.

Barclays by BBH - Purpose pays

The financial crash and banking scandals left trust in Barclays at record lows. To restore confidence and consideration, the banking group wanted to demonstrate how it helped society. Over four years, purpose-led marketing initiatives showed Barclays staff equipping different groups with digital and life skills, such as how to avoid fraud or use technology. Compared to its previous product campaigns, purpose initiatives led to 2.6 times the level of brand trust, an important driver of consideration in financial services. An estimated 460,000 financial products were sold and £153m of short-term income generated. The estimated short-term profit ROI was £2.30 for every £1 invested.

British Army (Capita, for the British Army) by Karmarama and MediaCom - Helping a new generation find where they belong in the British Army

Applications to join the British Army were plateauing. With social, political and demographic factors diminishing the recruitment pool, it needed to broaden its pool of potential applicants. Through insight, bespoke research and data analysis, it uncovered a new and surprising benefit with universal appeal – the sense of belonging. Storytelling channels, such as TV, cinema and VOD, showcased moments of authentic camaraderie and strong bonds, while using targeted media and executions helped exhibit a range of individual motivating factors for different audience segments. Social content invited potential applicants to engage individually with real soldiers and influencers. Regular soldier applicants rose by 38 per cent, reserve soldier applicants grew by 48 per cent, and the cost per application was significantly less than projected with increased media spend.

Covonia (Thornton & Ross) by Bray Leino - Rediscovering the power of Covonia

The cough medicine, Covonia, had lost share to a new entrant. Without big budgets, the brand needed to gain more young customers and quickly start growing again to prevent it being dropped by retailers. Its strategy was to frame the product’s strong taste as a challenge for people willing to ‘fight’ coughs. Provocative ‘Ride the Bull’ creative used TV and social to build affinity with the brand’s personality. Following the activity, penetration rose 12% above projection. The brand returned to market share growth. An estimated £4.45m of incremental revenue was generated and the brand’s future was protected.

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust by whiteGREY - Hello in Elephant: Translating an endangered language to help save an endangered species

Despite a decline in ivory trading, elephant populations were falling. Although there was no media budget, a way was needed to re-ignite concern and donations for elephant welfare. The solution was to create a unique opportunity to re-bond with elephants via an app that translated human words into elephant signals. The app triggered huge media interest and social sharing, motivating people to donate. An estimated 400m media impressions were generated and donations rose by 34% versus a 10% target. Almost 4,200 new supporters were recruited and $1.28m of incremental revenue delivered. The long-term profit ROMI was projected as £19.10 for every £1 invested.

DFS by krow communications and MediaCom - Turning DFS from a value brand into a brand that people value

To hit growth targets, DFS needed to attract a more affluent sofa shopper by broadening its appeal. It was critical, however, to address the balance between the competing needs of short-term sales driving activity and long-term brand health goals of increasing brand consideration and love. A multi-year strategy positioned DFS as a more realistic, revealing, popular, and likeable brand without downplaying the price offers it was famous for. Advertising campaigns featuring animated characters celebrated the production and quality testing of its sofas, with British Heart Foundation and Team GB partnerships used to build affinity. Following the activity, there was a 28% increase in consideration and penetration, amongst the more affluent sofa shopper, rose by 32%. The approach delivered an estimated £109m of incremental sales over six years and a 64% increase in profit ROI.

Direct Line Group by Direct Line Group and Ebiquity - They went short. We went long

DLG had to demonstrate the business case for marketing its multiple insurance brands: Direct Line, Churchill and Privilege. The company analysed what factors drove sales at each brand, measuring the contribution of brand and acquisition activity over short and long-terms. It used the learnings to set investment priorities across its portfolio, including more focus on brand-building TV, improving propositions and customer service. Brand preference and consideration rose across the portfolio. Total customers increased, led by Direct Line. This case estimates DLG brands contributed £46m profit to its home and motor insurance businesses.

Ella's Kitchen by Havas London - Selling up doesn’t mean selling out

With a small budget but ambitious growth targets, Ella’s Kitchen needed a smarter way to get more parents to buy its baby foods and become brand fans. Using its knowledge of how weaning can be a difficult experience, it developed a strategy to recruit and support mums and dads of weaning babies. The core of the plan was an always-on model featuring an advice hub and a CRM-driven initiative of emails and other communications to encourage users to recommend the brand. The programme drew in 40% of all new UK parents of weaning babies, generating £12.6m of incremental sales, and a 10% increase in penetration.

Guinness (Diageo) by AMV BBDO – Guinness: Made Of More, 2012 – 2018

Guinness has a high bar for creativity and effectiveness, but by 2015 the challenge heightened: distribution was tight, the economy continued to stagnate and competition was tougher. Guinness doubled down on its Made of More positioning with every iteration, creating stronger connections to culture that brought the platform to life in new and bold ways across the media mix, and genuinely resonated with its audience (from the story of Gareth Thomas to the Cowboys of Compton). Ultimately, bolder work paid dividends with on-trade value share growing 8% in GB and an estimated £4.13 profit returned for every £1 invested.

Heineken by Publicis Italia and Publicis Singapore - A Game Changer: How Heineken reinvented its champions league communications

Despite good awareness and brand fit of its UEFA Champions League (UCL) sponsorship, Heineken’s sales growth was shrinking and penetration had stalled. Soccer fans were more likely to drink the lager when they watched matches socially than if they viewed by themselves. Featuring José Mourinho as spokesman, a new international strategy for Champions League markets motivated fans to watch with others and drink Heineken using high-impact TV and online video. Personalised reminders and content provided further inducement. Following the brand’s activity, there was a 20% drop in games watched alone. Year-on-year volume growth in UCL markets grew to 13.7%, compared to declines in non-participating countries. Global brand penetration increased by 5%.

IAG Cargo, International Airlines Group by BBH - IAG Cargo FWD.Rewards: Building strength in numbers

IAG Cargo was dangerously reliant on a few big global air cargo accounts. It needed to grow business from small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). Using audience insight into how small businesses make decisions, it developed an SME loyalty programme and a more human approach to customer relationship management. This case demonstrates that the company’s loyalty scheme members spent 11% more than non-scheme customers. It estimates €14m incremental revenue was generated in 12 months on operating costs of €272,000. As a result of these changes, the gap between revenue from global accounts and SMEs was projected to halve in three years.

IKEA by Mother and Vizeum - The Wonderful Everyday

After 25 years of growth, IKEA’s UK sales, penetration and footfall were all declining. It needed to gain more customers and get people to buy a broader range of its products. ‘The Wonderful Everyday’ strategy rejected seasonal or event-driven marketing for an always-on approach with more personalised copy. Media were chosen to reach consumers when they were most likely to be thinking of their homes. Penetration rose 10% and all IKEA product categories reported growth. It is estimated that £755m of incremental revenue was generated and the ROMI was calculated at £2.31 for every £1 invested.

Lidl by TBWA\London and Starcom - How Lidl grew a lot

Shoppers were sceptical about Lidl’s value model, assuming that cheaper meant worse. To address this perception and increase household penetration, Lidl adopted a more mass reach strategy. Between 2014 and 2017, campaigns focused on revealing truths about the brand and its products, backed with increased media spend. Following the activity, Lidl’s market share peaked at 5.3%. This case estimates that £2.7bn of direct and long-term sales were generated, with a £398m net profit delivered over four years.

National Art Pass (Art Fund) by MullenLowe London - The art of effectiveness

In early 2016, Art Fund was in a healthy position. Revenue had almost doubled in five years and the charity's membership had never been higher. This success changed expectations and a target of a 30% increase in new members was set. Underlying trends made this daunting. A new strategy was developed to highlight the emotions art can inspire. By adding films and podcasts to its media mix, the brand was able to tell richer stories. Following the change in approach, there was a record 44% increase in members, £12.5m of new revenue from members, and a profit return of approximately £2 for every £1 invested.

Nationwide Building Society by VCCP and Wavemaker London - How Nationwide found its voice and the difference that made

Nationwide had a small share of the declining market in current account switchers. A shift from rational to more emotional advertising produced a temporary improvement. But it took the radical ‘Voices’ strategy, featuring TV poetry ads and a more individual tone across media, to set Nationwide apart from other banking brands. Following this activity, brand differentiation, trust and affinity all rose. Advertising drove an estimated 63k switched accounts and 242k new account openings. Total value created for Nationwide members was modelled at £2.66 for every £1 invested.

Parodontax (GSK) by Grey London - Selling an oral care oxymoron: Toothpaste for gums

The challenge for GSK’s small gum care brand, parodontax, (Corsodyl in the UK) was to convince consumers to switch from regular toothpastes to its products that also treated gum disease. Strategy developed the metaphor of a journey towards socially embarrassing disease symptoms, like bad breath and bleeding gums, unless people treated the condition early. A single creative idea was deployed internationally to maximise media spend and increase share of voice. TV ads brought impact, with other channels used to cut through with consumers in mornings or whilst travelling. Ads outperformed on awareness and likelihood to persuade disease non-treaters to buy the brand. Incremental sales of almost £50m were generated and paradontax became the world’s fastest-growing multi-market toothpaste brand.

Prospan (Flordis Australia) by AFFINITY - The world's first cough predictor

The natural children’s cough remedy, Prospan, was fighting against bigger rivals to maintain its Australian sales. Its target audience – mums – was conflicted on how to deal with kids’ coughs and prone to ‘wait and see’ before administering remedies. Using search, social and algorithms, an innovative predictor of outbreaks of colds was developed to target messages at the most opportune moments. ‘Don’t ignore a cough’ creative was distributed in print and activated digitally via programmatic in real-time to reach mums when coughs were likely to be increasing. Click-through on digital was 54% higher than a control group. Sales grew by 10% in six months despite an 8.5% decline in the category following one of the warmest winters on record. Market share rose by 18.5% in a half year.

Purplebricks by SNAP LDN - How Purplebricks brought Commisery to the UK's estate agents

Online estate agents had failed to disrupt the property market despite trading for almost a decade. To drive consideration and increase instructions to sell homes, the online-based Purplebricks needed to engage the mass market with its key differentiator - unlike most estate agents, it does not charge sellers commissions. It invested in TV-led advertising empathising with people’s ‘commisery’ – an imagined despondency you might feel if you thought you had needlessly paid out thousands in commission. Following the campaign, consideration rose from 23% to 38%. Market share almost doubled and revenue grew by £35.1m (218%) in 2016-17. The change helped the company swing from a £4.4m loss to a £3.7m profit in one financial year.

Ribena (Lucozade Ribena Suntory) by J. Walter Thompson - Ribena: A case for the defence

Ribena was losing revenues and relevance as squash sales fell and new premium soft drinks entered the market. The brand needed to regain salience and attract new young adult buyers. It took a bold step to move away from its brand heritage to prioritise the Ready to Drink (RTD) and out of home drinks opportunities. Creative emphasised the experience of tasting Ribena with a quirky colour-filled world evoked via TV, outdoor, an app, social, and experiential. Awareness, relevance and taste metrics all grew. Ribena experienced 3.4% value growth despite an 11.1% decline in the RTD category. An estimated £24.1m of incremental revenue was generated and Ribena’s master brand returned to growth from an 8.7% decline.

Rogue (Nissan Canada) by Juniper Park\TBWA - From also-ran to front-runner: How Nissan made Rogue a sales hero by making winter heroes of Canadian drivers

Nissan Canada wanted its re-launched Rogue to improve on its predecessors with a dramatic and sustained rise in share of its category. It was especially important to persuade Canadians that the car performed well off-road in the country’s challenging winters. The ‘Winter Heroes’ strategy broke with automotive convention by using TV ads in the style of Hollywood superhero movies, with supporting digital and social, to distinguish the car from rival models. Between 2014 and 2017, Rogue’s brand differentiation metrics strengthened. The car’s category share almost doubled, with gains held over time. An estimated 64,927 extra Rogues were sold, worth nearly $1.9bn in incremental revenue. The net profit generated was calculated at $60.7m.

SK-II (P&G) by Forsman & Bodenfors - SK-II: The Marriage Market Takeover: How giving 'leftover' women in China a voice transformed a luxury skin care brand

In China, women who are single after the age of 27 are known as ‘leftover women’. Some Chinese parents post details of ‘available’ daughters in public ‘Marriage Markets’ to attract the parents of single sons. P&G’s luxury skincare brand, SK-II, wanted to make itself more relevant to women by supporting their right to control their own destinies. It created a documentary celebrating single women and encouraging parents to respect daughters’ life choices. Outdoor and activations amplified the conservation which generated huge media buzz. Following the activity. brand salience, price and market share all strengthened. Average new users per month grew by almost 100% and sales nearly doubled in a year. SK-II became Asia’s number one brand in its category.

Skittles (Mars) by adam&eveDDB - Breaking conventions with Pride

UK sales of Skittles were declining. As an impulse buy, the confectionery brand needed to be top of mind and more visible in stores. To reach young adults - often light TV viewers – it sought new ways to gain salience and improve retail distribution. In partnership with Tesco, Skittles launched a new product without its famous rainbow branding, to show support for the LGBT+ community’s rainbow flag and create buzz during Pride festival season. The launch generated social sharing and a total 250m impressions - 73% unpaid. In a flat market, Skittles value share rose 4.2%, with dramatic growth in Tesco stores and around Pride. Whilst decreasing in other retailers, distribution in Tesco grew 92%, opening up fresh opportunities to collaborate with the UK’s biggest retailer.

Soothers (Nestlé) by Ogilvy Australia - Any number of sore throats

Soothers - an Australian throat lozenge brand - had lost retail distribution which could translate into a projected 31% drop in market share. To stay in business, Soothers had to regain relevance quickly and re-assert its place on retailers’ shelves. Rather than fight in the market for cold sufferers, it repositioned as a purchase for mild, everyday sore throats. A light-hearted creative approach was delivered via channels including outdoor, digital, TV, radio, and weather apps. Following this activity, awareness and active consideration grew. Share loss was minimised from the expected 31% to 14%, and value increased in key retailers. Revenue stabilised in year one and grew 20% in year two.

Sport England by FCB Inferno - This Girl Can: Giving judgement the finger (& inspiring millions of women to get active)

In 2014, 1.79m fewer women than men were exercising regularly, and the gap was growing. Sport England’s objective was to reduce this gender gap. The discovery that ‘fear of judgement’ was holding women back inspired a campaign (spanning TV, cinema, outdoor, digital, social, PR and influencers) that celebrated the triumph of a ‘don’t give a damn’ attitude over society’s judgement. Over 2 million women became more active as a direct result and the gender gap reduced from 1.79m to 1.55m. Based on incremental sports and health benefits generated, the estimated Return on Marketing Investment was £35 for every £1 invested.

Starbucks by Manning Gottlieb OMD - Starbucks and social: How Starbucks created the fourth place in coffee culture

Across seven years, Starbucks UK reallocated investment from traditional media into a social strategy which evolved as consumers’ social behaviour changed. Early focus on using social to communicate events and seasonal offers gave way to encouraging coffee cup imagery to be used as a creative focal point. Later, the brand saw opportunities for further growth and engagement by supporting the then nascent culture of self-expression and involving influencers. This case demonstrates how Starbucks UK has used social to deliver sustainable business growth and compares the business impact of investment in social and traditional media. Since 2010, it estimates that social generated almost £18m more for the brand than investing in traditional channels. It calculates the strategy returned almost £4 in additional profit for every £1 invested.

Suzuki by the7stars - Suzuki Saturdays

Suzuki’s share of the UK market languished at 1.3% at the end of 2015. Consumer insight, motor reviews and dealer feedback indicated there was an opportunity to emphasise the fun in driving Suzuki cars. To highlight enjoyment and grow consideration, Suzuki formed a content partnership with ITV’s ‘Saturday Night Takeaway’, spanning talent, licensing, broadcast sponsorship, and content creation. Following the launch of #SuzukiSaturdays, brand consideration reached a record 44%, while increased share of market made Suzuki the fastest-growing UK car brand for two years running. This case estimates the approach paid back £207m in incremental revenue.

The AA by adam&eveDDB and Carat - The AA: From spark-plugs to singalongs

Like many brands, the AA had been focussing on efficient delivery of short-term results via direct, targeted comms. This seemed to be working – profit was growing. But a new team looked beyond short-term results and discovered a worrying picture of market share and membership decline, driven by increased price sensitivity and falling salience. So the AA overhauled its marketing and re-invested in brand communications. The resulting campaigns rebuilt salience and image, increasing both acquisition and retention. The strengthened brand enabled the group to raise prices – driving stable revenue growth and delivering a profit ROMI of £2.23 for every £1 invested.

True Match (L’Oréal Paris) by McCann London - How L'Oréal Paris UK True Match climbed to No.1 by making everyone feel ‘Worth It’

The UK market for foundation make-up was growing, but the True Match brand had been stuck in fifth place for 3 years. It aimed to attract 256,000 new customers and become market leader within a year. Conventional wisdom dictates that mass marketing should focus on the majority for the biggest returns. Unfortunately, this leaves minorities feeling ignored, especially in mass cosmetics. True Match saw an opportunity to recruit consumers who felt excluded from the category because of their skin tone, or the industry’s ideas of beauty and functional messaging. Partnering with 23 diverse influencers – each with a True Match shade and personal story to share – the brand communicated it was suitable for every kind of face, for every shade. Mass media followed - all under a new L’Oréal end line: “Because we’re all worth it”. The brand’s value share leapt into first place, further increasing its lead in year two. Estimated short-term revenue ROI was £2.90 for every £1 invested, and the strategy was rolled out to 15 countries.

U by Kotex (Kimberly Clark Australia) by Ogilvy Australia – ‘Let's move on’

With low growth for over a decade, U By Kotex, the Australian femcare brand, was under threat of deletion by retailers. By downplaying the importance of femcare brands in women’s lives, U By Kotex created relevance and differentiated itself from competitors. Provocative TV ads were launched with social and online support, later amplified by outdoor. Key brand measures such as love and affinity experienced double-digit rises. An estimated $12.9m of incremental revenue was generated. After languishing in 3rd position for years, the brand moved into leadership in 18 months.

Virgin Media by BBH - Finding our Virginity: How fighting fact with feeling helped Virgin Media take on the might of Sky

Despite having a smaller budget, Virgin Media needed to compete better for TV and broadband customers against category leader, Sky. The role of communications was to ensure Virgin was prominent and worth a premium in consumers’ minds when choosing a supplier. Over two years, TV brand and direct marketing evoked the Virgin masterbrand’s rule-breaking personality to communicate the benefits of fast broadband and seamless technology more emotionally. Brand metrics improved and Virgin grew its share of net new broadband connections from 27.1% to 44.4%. Econometrics calculated that marketing drove £633m of incremental net value, based on the projected net revenues of customer acquisitions over three years.

Vype (British American Tobacco) by J. Walter Thompson - Vype quality: A tale of two marketing models

The expansion of vaping brand Vype was hit by regulatory changes and negative media coverage of its catgory. To re-start growth, the brand had to become more associated with trust and quality, whilst adding 20,000 customers. Strategy evolved from using bursts of media to build reach to always-on exposure of consumers to trust and quality messages over multiple channels. Touchpoints included pharmacies, editorial partnerships, blogs, and email. Brand metrics exceeded targets and over 33,000 net new customer additions were reported. Market share grew and Vype’s retail sales increased by 18.6% in a declining sector. Short-term profit ROI was estimated at £1.04 for every £1 invested.

Weetabix by BBH and Ebiquity - A Rembrandt in the attic: Rediscovering the value of 'Have you had your Weetabix?'

Analysis established that the line, ‘Have you had your Weetabix?’, was the most powerful idea in the cereal category. But Weetabix, which was declining along with its market, hadn’t used this line in years. Bringing it back in TV ads for children and adults, along with a packaging change, aimed to increase penetration and purchase frequency by making the brand more ‘available’ in shoppers’ minds. Neuro testing showed the line was key to the ads’ emotional impact. Econometrics quantified that Weetabix’ marketing delivered £4.5m extra revenue in 2017 and its ROI tripled. The brand returned to growth, surpassing £150m of sales for the first time.

Yorkshire Tea (Bettys and Taylors of Harrogate) by Lucky Generals and Goodstuff Communications - Waking the sleep shoppers: A proper effective campaign for Yorkshire Tea

Standard black tea is a habitual purchase where brand loyalty is three times the FMCG average, but in this shrinking market Yorkshire Tea needed to win consumers from other brands if it wanted to grow. The ‘Where everything’s done proper’ strategy achieved this, waking up ‘sleep shopping’ tea buyers. Funny TV and online advertising featuring Yorkshire celebrities such as Sir Michael Parkinson and the Brownlees convinced consumers of Yorkshire Tea’s quality. Drinkers switched and both sales and value share surged, making Yorkshire tea Britain’s second favourite tea brand. An estimated £2.81 profit was generated for every £1 invested.

Last updated 13/08/2018


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